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When I ask you a question I am the inquisitor or or the inquirer. But what are you, the one to whom I'm asking the question? Here's the example I'm working with: the children's book "Are you My Mother?"...the hatchling asks that question to many things (animals, objects); I'd love to have one word to describe those animals and things he's posing the question to...the object of the inquirer.

  • @EdwinAshworth I can't find a definition for "inquiree". – Snoop Mar 26 '16 at 16:05
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    Possible duplicate of three other questions: (1)english.stackexchange.com/questions/12999/…: (2) english.stackexchange.com/questions/18022/… (3) english.stackexchange.com/questions/18022/… Please check all three; if none of them answer your question, then edit your question to explain why none of them do. – ab2 Mar 26 '16 at 16:09
  • @StevieV It was a candidate word used by the OP in their question. Hence the query. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 26 '16 at 16:22
  • I don't think any of the answers in the maybe-duplicate questions fit the OP's example, so I have voted to reopen. – ab2 Mar 26 '16 at 17:19
  • @ab2 Can you explain why Merriam-Webster's 'questionee: one that is questioned' doesn't answer 'But what are you, the one to whom I'm asking [sic] the question?'? – Edwin Ashworth Mar 26 '16 at 17:29
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This person is called the:

Respondent

See the definition at dictionary.com

| improve this answer | |
  • What if a person is asked but doesn't reply? I don't think respondent works in that case? – k1eran Mar 26 '16 at 15:47
  • @k1eran definitely a very good point. Then in that case they definitely wouldn't be responding to anything would they? – Snoop Mar 26 '16 at 15:48
  • I nearly answered target but seems a bit imprecise? – k1eran Mar 26 '16 at 15:54
  • @k1eran No I think that definitely works, only target can be applied to anything. However target (person the question is directed at) might work better because the person being asked doesn't necessarily have to respond. In context "the target of the question" makes perfect sense to me. – Snoop Mar 26 '16 at 15:56
  • Correct about "what if the person doesn't reply"; thus respondent doesn't work; and "target of the question" doesn't work in that it needs to be one word if possible. Here's the example I'm working with: the children's book "Are you My Mother?"...the hatchling asks that question to many things (animals, objects); I'd love to have one word to describe those animals and things he's posing the question to. – Bshafe5 Mar 26 '16 at 16:34

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