1

What English proverb can be matched to this Telugu proverb?

There is no harm in lying 1000 times in order to perform a single successful marriage.

This is a famous proverb in Southern India, where arranged marriage is more prevalent than love marriage.

Is there any English proverb that is equivalent to this proverb or which describes about the hardships that are faced to successfully pull off a marriage?

Please don't edit my question, it is from Telugu language not tamil.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Drew, anongoodnurse, jimm101, tchrist, curiousdannii Mar 21 '16 at 13:37

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Can you explain what it means to "do one marriage"? – Snoop Mar 21 '16 at 2:38
  • We really need a more explicit verb other than "do", and quickly before people start downvoting/flagging this. – Snoop Mar 21 '16 at 3:32
  • Actually the saying is from Tamil, "Aayiram poi solli oru kalyanam pannalaam" meaning, "For one successful marriage, you can even lie 1000 times". But the real proverb is not this, The original version is, "Aayiram per-idam solli oru kalyaanam pannu". That means, "Spread the word to 1000 persons and perform a marriage. Don't engage yourself in a secret marriage". It has been changed in the recent years. Mostly in movies. – Nagarajan Shanmuganathan Mar 21 '16 at 3:38
  • 1
    @NagarajanShanmuganathan Are you sure your edit shows the correct meaning? I think this proverb actually means "the end justifies the means". – NVZ Mar 21 '16 at 4:42
  • 4
    Any similarity with "all's fair in love and war"? i.e. When it comes to romantic relationships, the normal rules don't count. – Karl Mar 21 '16 at 4:46
2

An equivalent expression in English is:

The end justifies the means

This means that no matter how immoral the process is, it is justified if the end result is appropriate.

For example, in the situation you are asking about, the means are the lies told and the ends is the marriage, and bringing the marriage into being justifies the lies told.

(But that's a subject for debate...)

Prov. You can use bad or immoral methods as long as you accomplish something good by using them. (Not everyone agrees with this idea.)

Lucy got money for the orphanage by embezzling it from the firm where she worked. "The end justifies the means," she told herself.

The politician clearly believed that the end justifies the means, since he used all kinds of nefarious means to get elected.

-1

"Aayiram poi solli oru kalyanam pannalaam" meaning, "For one successful marriage, you can even lie 1000 times".

Comment from @NagarajanShanmuganathan above

As @Karl says, a good English proverb here would be, "All's fair in love and war".

But the real proverb is not this, The original version is, "Aayiram per-idam solli oru kalyaanam pannu". That means, "Spread the word to 1000 persons and perform a marriage. Don't engage yourself in a secret marriage".

Comment continued

This nicely maps to, "Why would he buy the cow if he can get the milk for free?"

  • 1
    Not my dv. I don't think the "cow/milk" expression is suitable in this context. – NVZ Mar 21 '16 at 16:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.