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In some common phrases like, "You are what you eat", "Your actions reflect who you are". Is there a reason (besides it sounds funny) to not use, "You're what you eat", "Your actions reflect who you're"?

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    Pronounce the contracted forms and then the non-contracted forms. You should notice that 'are' takes intonation (there's a higher vocal stress) but the contraction does not (it's a weak form). You have given examples of traditionally emphatic sentences (general truths), which just sound better with intonation. There are also grammatical rules that prohibit ending a sentence with a subject/verb contraction (isn't, didn't, etc. are verb/adverb contractions), and lessons in sentence balance which suggest, since you cannot contract 'you eat', that you should not contract 'you are'. – Egox Mar 18 '16 at 16:42
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    @Egox Are you saying that 'I was going to go over and see Frank last Tuesday, but I didn't' is ungrammatical? – Edwin Ashworth Mar 19 '16 at 1:23
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    @EdwinAshworth: Not at all. It's subject/verb contractions that are not allowed, whereas verb/adverb contractions are. – Egox Mar 19 '16 at 5:08
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    I'm unable to edit my first comment, but to clarify: ending a sentence with a subject/verb contraction is ungrammatical, but end with a verb/adverb contraction (e.g., isn't, didn't, etc.) is both idiomatic and grammatical. – Egox Mar 19 '16 at 5:14
  • @Egox Sorry; I managed to garden-path the parenthetical. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 19 '16 at 14:27
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Nope! I notice that "you're" as a contraction for "you are" tends to only be used in front of verbals ("You're going out wearing that?") rather than just any old time "you" and "are" are next to each other.

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    Not just verbals, but also some noun phrases and adjectives: "You're a genius." "You're brilliant." – Andreas Blass Mar 18 '16 at 16:01

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