0

I understand 's means is and has, if 's is used at the end of a name, Does it mean is or has?Let's suppose Ex is a someone's name.

Ex is object -it can mean Ex is an object, totally incorrect

Ex has object -incorrect grammar and it does not refer to have something

What does 's really mean? What is the no-contraction mode of name_of_a_person's?

closed as off-topic by Drew, anongoodnurse, Jim, Dan Bron, Nathaniel Mar 17 '16 at 19:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • -'s forms the possessive: i.e. John's car might be rephrased as the car of John or the car belonging to John. – Anonym Mar 17 '16 at 3:56
1

When it's not a contraction it's about possession. But it's really not that simple. Here's a source that attempts to explain all the cases.

Apostrophes with Names Ending in s, ch, or z
Are you confused about how to show the plural and the possessive of certain names? Maybe you know to write I met the Smiths, I drove Brenda Smith’s Ferrari, and I visited the Smiths’ house. But what if the name is Sanchez or Church or Williams?

Rule: To show the plural of a name that ends with a ch, s, or z sound, add es. If a name ends in ch, but is pronounced with a hard k sound, its plural will require s, rather than es.

Examples:
The Sanchezes will be over soon.
The Thomases moved away.
The Churches have arrived but the Bohmbachs are running late.

Rule: To show singular possession of a name ending in ch, add ’s on the end of the name.

Example:
Harry Birch’s house

Rule: To show singular possession of a name ending in s or z, some writers add just an apostrophe. Others also add another s. See Rules 1b and 1c of Apostrophes for more discussion.

Examples:
Bill Williams’ car OR Bill Williams’s car
Mrs. Sanchez’s children

Rule: To show plural possession of a name ending in s, ch, or z, form the plural first; then immediately use the apostrophe.

Examples:
the Williamses’ car
the Birches’ house
the Sanchezes’ children

grammarbook

But it's not even that simple as explained in: Is “ ’s ” ever correct for pluralization?

And the name itself can change the way you should show possession, as explained here: Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.