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I'm going to send an email to a professor. There is a sentence that I think may be wrong because I'm not sure about using will after when, even though it obviously refers to the future.

But definitely I would love to join to your team and I hope you have an open position when I will apply for the next year.

What are the rules here?

closed as off-topic by MetaEd, jimm101, user140086, curiousdannii, Roaring Fish Mar 17 '16 at 13:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Jack. "Can you correct this?" is a proof-reading request. "What are the rules here?" is asking to know how it should be corrected. It's also more useful to future enquirers who might find this question. – Andrew Leach Mar 16 '16 at 20:46
  • Possible duplicate of Future tense usage: "When you see it ..." – user140086 Mar 17 '16 at 6:21
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But I would definitely love to join your team. I hope you will have an open position when I apply next year.

Done with contractions: (A little less formal)

But I'd definitely love to join your team. I hope you'll have an open position when I apply next year.

Your word order is salvageable with punctuation. I only removed 'and' as a mater of style. Though 'will' and 'for the' are simply not needed.

But, definitely, I would love to join to your team and I hope you have an open position when I will apply for the next year.

Done this way puts a pause before and after 'definitely' that highlights it for emphasis. Which may or may not be what you want.

Some people discourage the over use of I. Better not to make everything about you:

If you have an open position when applications are accepted next year I would definitely be interested in joining your team.

  • This is not an answer, though. The question specifically asked "What are the rules here?" – Andrew Leach Mar 17 '16 at 10:08

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