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I'm trying to name a question of mine:

I'm translating English to Hindi, what's it called when the translations are with English characters?

And instead of naming it: I'm translating English to Hindi, what's it called when the translations are with English characters?

I can name it something like: I'm translating English to Hindi, what's it called when Non-English Character'd translations are with English characters?

Catch my drift?

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    It's not called "English" characters. It is called "Latin" character set. That is the internationally accepted name for that character set. ISO-8859-1 or CP-1252. – Blessed Geek Mar 11 '16 at 3:34
  • Also, your title should be "Names of languages ..." rather than "name of languages". In fact, it should just be "Written languages that don't ..." – Blessed Geek Mar 11 '16 at 3:35
  • So you'll be creating a "hinglish" dictionary. Get it? – NVZ Mar 11 '16 at 4:23
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You are looking for an accepted, known term for a non-English charactered language or text. It is common to qualify such a thing as non-Latin script. For example:

Hindi is a non-Latin script language.

The letter was written in a non-Latin script.

You can find more examples by Googling [ non-Latin script ].

So your corrected question might read:

What’s it called when a translation to a non-Latin script language (or text) uses Latin characters?

(Incidentally, the term for representing a non-Latin script language with Latin characters is “romanization”, or alternatively “latinization”.)

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_languages_by_writing_system

Given that there are so many types of scripts, I doubt there is a real word for "Non-Latin script" other than that. So your question might better be phrased "I'm translating English to Hindi; what's it called when Latin script is borrowed into a different script?" or "what's it called when non-Latin scripts use Latin characters?" By the way the "English characters" are known as "Latin characters."

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