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I have a sentence: "As she reaches an inch from your face, something burning inside you (love) caused you to raise your arms and envelop her slim figure."

"inside you caused you" sounds repetitive. I tried just using "As she reaches an inch from your face, something burning inside caused you to raise your arms and envelop her slim figure." But then the reader may mistake that for something literally burning inside the house. Or is that implication okay?

How to improve the wording to remove this repetition?

closed as off-topic by Drew, user140086, ab2, curiousdannii, jimm101 Mar 7 '16 at 1:17

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  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – Drew, Community, ab2, curiousdannii, jimm101
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Since the context is clearly defined, the readers should automatically assume there is nothing burning inside the house. Your original wording is fine.

You can also say:

your burning desire caused you...

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