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Which sentence is correct, i.e., do I need a comma?

I will introduce the topics A, B, and C.

OR

I will introduce the topics, A, B, and C.

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    They are both acceptable. The first means that you are introducing the topics A, B, and C, and perhaps others will introduce C, D.... The second uses the comma to signal an appositive. I will introduce the topics; they are A, B, and C. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 4 '16 at 14:47
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    In your second example, it would be more understandable to use a colon. I will introduce the topics: A, B, and C. Still, it seems the first example reads better even if both are correct. – Stu W Jul 3 '16 at 1:05
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Usually when introducing a list after a sequence of words consisting of {verb} + {noun}, a comma and a colon can both be used.

For a comma, the first sentence would be more conventional

I will introduce the topics A, B, and C.

For a colon, it's the same as the second sentence except the first comma is replaced with a colon

I will introduce the topics: A, B, and C.

As one user suggested, the reason why "I will introduce the topics, A, B, and C." is less common is that it could be incorrectly interpreted. One could read it and think that you will be introducing four things as opposed to three topics, with the four things being the topics, A, B, and C. A sentence that could exemplify this is

I will introduce the topics, objectives, proposals, and results.

With this sentence it's hard to tell if "objectives, proposals, and results" are the topics or if they are separate from the topics.

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Assuming A B and C are the topics, the first option is better. By inserting the comma one could read it that "topics" is in the list of things being introduced.

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    One would be unlikely to read such a thing, but the second version is awkward. – ArtOfCode Mar 4 '16 at 18:15
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    Agreed. However, it would be less awkward to use a colon, especially if the listed topics are complex phrases – Stu W Mar 4 '16 at 18:21
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To me, the best way to use the commas in this sentence is no comma after topic and no comma after B: 'I will introduce the topics A, B and C.' Example: 'I will introduce the topics strategy design, strategy implementation and strategy evaluation.'

The use of a comma after B may be justified to avoid confusion on the different parts of the enumeration. Example: 'I will introduce the topics strategy design, strategy implementation and de-implementation, and strategy evaluation.'

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