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Is the following sentence grammatically correct?

"I am however concerned about global warming and the environment, and am wondering if those who are familiar with the subject could share their knowledge."

Specifically, I am wondering about the use of the word "and" in this sentence.

I'm also wondering if I should instead say

"I am however concerned about global warming, the environment, and am wondering if those who are familiar with the subject could share their knowledge."

This doesn't sound correct at all, but it agrees with my current understanding of how one should write this sentence.

closed as off-topic by user140086, Dan Bron, tchrist, choster, jimm101 Mar 5 '16 at 3:31

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    Welcome to English Language & Usage. Proofreading questions ("Is this correct?", "Are there any mistakes?") or critique requests are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified. Please make sure you take the tour and visit our help center for additional guidance and edit your question accordingly. – user140086 Mar 4 '16 at 6:48
  • There are two 'and's in the sentence; which one do you mean? – Tyler Kropp Mar 4 '16 at 6:52
  • I am wondering about both – user163453 Mar 4 '16 at 6:53
  • If you are wondering whether the usage of ', and' is correct, I can tell you it is not. Comma usage. – Tyler Kropp Mar 4 '16 at 6:53
  • @samarbarrett What do you wonder about them? Please be as specific and detailed as you can about your concerns and doubts. As Rathony highlighted, EL&U doesn't provide a service where just look at sentences you provide and tell you everything we think is wrong with them. This is a Q&A site, meaning concreted, directed, questions, and fixed, bounded answers. If you want more of a discussion, or discourse, or tutelage, you'll need to find a forum. We're not a forum. – Dan Bron Mar 4 '16 at 6:57
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In your example, you are not listing three things. You have a compound predicate with two elements, and the first element has a compound object with two elements. Therefore, your first example is correct, and the second is not.

After all, you could not say:

I am concerned about global warming. I am concerned about the environment. *I am concerned about am wondering if those familiar with the subject could share their knowledge.

Most advice seems to condemn using a comma in a compound predicate:

I fed the cat and walked the dog.
*I fed the cat, and walked the dog.

However, there are many examples where I find it preferable:

I am tired, and hope to sleep.
*I am tired and hope to sleep.

In your case, I prefer the comma, because it helps set the second part of the predicate apart from the compound object in the first part. Consider

*I am however concerned about global warming and the environment and am wondering if those who are familiar with the subject could share their knowledge.

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To begin, the correct sentence is:

I am however concerned about global warming and the environment and am wondering if those who are familiar with the subject could share their knowledge.

Note: This is likely spoken language, as this would be an awkward compound sentence in writing.


The first and in the first half of the sentence is connecting two nouns to form a single object of the sentence.

I am however concerned about (global warming and the environment)...

The second and is combining two separate sentences as a compound predicate:

I am however concerned about global warming and the environment.

I am wondering if those who are familiar with the subject could share their knowledge.

The reason a comma is not added when combining the sentences is that when using conjunctions, one must put a comma before the conjunction when the second sentence can stand alone and/or the first sentence cannot stand alone.

Also as a rule of comma usage, commas are not put between two verbs of a compound predicate.

Two examples of this are the following:

When Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his chemistry quiz, it was very noisy.

Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his chemistry quiz, but it was hard to concentrate because of the noise.

These examples and more information can be accessed at the Purdue OWL.

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    But the second and is not combining two sentences (nor 2 independent clauses). It is combining two elements of a compound predicate that share a single subject. – phoog Mar 4 '16 at 7:15
  • @phoog ah yes, that is the name – Tyler Kropp Mar 4 '16 at 7:17
  • But a compound predicate is not "separate sentences" as there is only one subject. – phoog Mar 4 '16 at 7:25
  • @phoog It's all one sentence, correct. The compound predicate is derived from the combination of two ideas, however. – Tyler Kropp Mar 4 '16 at 7:29