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According to Google:

A rhetorical question is a question that you ask without expecting an answer. The question might be one that does not have an answer. It might also be one that has an obvious answer but you have asked the question to make a point, to persuade or for literary effect.

There are some questions you already know the answer to, and are asking for effect rather than to receive an answer, but still expect the other person to answer.

Q: Little Suzy, did you take the last piece of cake?

Q: Jim, what was it you said earlier about this lake not having leeches in it? (Jim is currently picking leeches out of his underwear ala Stand By Me)

Are these still rhetorical questions? It is common for people to ask questions, and when someone attempts a reply, to correct the person, saying, "It was a rhetorical question."

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Whether or not a question is rethorical depends entirely on context.

To use your examples:

Q: Little Suzy, did you take the last piece of cake?

Did you see her take the last piece of the plate and you just want her to realize that she took it without asking, something you might have discussed earlier as part of her upbringing? Then it is rhetorical. Even though Suzy might answer, being unfamiliar with the concept of rhetorical question, your intention was to cause a realisation, not get a yes/no answer.
Do you enter the kitchen and you see the empty plate, but have no idea who took it, then it's a straight up search for truth.

Q: Jim, what was it you said earlier about this lake not having leeches in it? (Jim is currently picking leeches out of his underwear ala Stand By Me)

This is absolutely a good example of a rhetorical question.

To give an another example, for completeness sake:

Can you repeat that again? -> Do I look like a parrot to you? -> Pleeeeease?

Assuming the person is dressed like a human, the answer 'no' is obvious, the question asker picks up on the actual statement made, and replies accordingly.

This page here does a good job summarizing it:
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.

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  • The intent of the second question is to draw Jim's attention to what he said earlier. The asker knows what Jim said earlier, and is reminding him of it sarcastically. This might be a regional difference in choice of phrasing.
    – user
    Mar 3, 2016 at 21:44
  • Hi User, thanks, but that part was clear from the perspective of the asker. I tried to illustrate that in order for a rhetorical question to be a truly successful one, the person being asked will also have to recognise it as such, hence the bit about rephrasing the question (to make the rhetorical part more obvious for Jim, in this case). I hope that clarifies my input on that 2nd example :)
    – Terah
    Mar 3, 2016 at 21:48
  • What the wikipedia article says actually seems to answer the question because of this phrase "Though a rhetorical question does not require a direct answer, in many cases it may be intended to start a discussion or at least draw an acknowledgement that the listener understands the intended message."
    – user
    Mar 3, 2016 at 21:50
  • @Terah, I have the impression that you misread the second question as something like "was it you who said earlier...", I.e. trying to find out who said something. To me, the second question is clearly rhetorical.
    – Oliphaunt
    Mar 3, 2016 at 21:52
  • @Oliphaunt - I had to scroll back up and do a word-by-word to realize you are absolutely right! OP: my apologies to you as well, I will correct my answer immediately.
    – Terah
    Mar 3, 2016 at 22:00
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I'd say

Little Suzy, did you take the last piece of cake?

is generally not a rhetorical question, even if the asker thinks they already know the answer - they actually expect Suzy to say something. But depending on the context, it could be rhetorical too.

Jim, what was it you said earlier about this lake not having leeches in it?

Given then context you mentioned, this is a rhetorical question. Clearly, this question is being asked only to drive home the point that Jim was wrong.

Whether a question is rhetorical or not depends on the context, so it sometimes may not be very clear. Much of it depends on knowing local idioms and style.

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