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I found the word in Heinlein's "Friday":

I apologized, saying that there was no excuse for me to be sleepy since it was still early evening by the zone where I had started the day.

Janet said pishantosh, that being sleepy had nothing to do with clocks and time zones -- gentlemen, we are going to bed. She led me away.

I think, I can grasp the meaning from the above context, but I'm surprised, search-engines return nothing useful for it. What does the word actually mean and where is it coming from?

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    Bah and humbug! Pish and tosh! – FumbleFingers Mar 2 '16 at 1:05
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    The close votes asking for more research ... there's nothing coming back on a google search. I don't know where else someone could look for this. – jimm101 Mar 2 '16 at 3:02
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It's a variation of pish and tosh, pish tosh or pish-tush, the latter being the name of a character in Gilbert and Sullivan;s The Mikado.

Slangwords Dictionary (hardly the OED, but pishandtosh! we're talking about a quaint colloquialism here) offers the following:

Pish Tosh
Rubbish, bunk, a ridiculous proposition. Popularized in the quippy expression; "Pish Tosh and a bottle of Pinosh on a hot summer's day in Koshkonong!" Rubbish, Bunk, A perposterous proposition. Made popular by the quippy expression; "Pish Tosh and a bottle of Pinosh on a hot summer's day in Koshkonong!" The sound a t*rd makes when it hits the water. Dude, I was in the bathroom, and it was all like "Pish tosh" and stuff! It was intense!

Heinlein seems to have enjoyed using euphemisms for more serious maledictions, the stranger and more obscure the better.

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