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So I have a debt of $500. After a month, I owe $600 because my debtor has added to my account due to interest (also because the account has a terrible APR). In this situation I would say my creditor has (1._________). I would also say interest has been (2.______) against my account

I could swear I've read this word in context, I just can't for the life of me remember it.

  • negative amortization – CDM Mar 1 '16 at 19:27
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    Are you looking for debited? Or simply charged? Interest has accrued, but the debtor hasn't accrued, and it hasn't accrued against anything. – jejorda2 Mar 1 '16 at 19:28
  • There really isn't any word, except to say that the creditor has added interest to the account. – WS2 Mar 1 '16 at 21:58
  • Or are you looking for levied? – Edwin Ashworth Mar 1 '16 at 22:58
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For #1, I can't think of a single word that would fit there. It would mostly require at least two words, including a direct object (probably "me" or "my account").

For #2, interest accrues, but when it gets added to your amount owed, it becomes capitalized.

https://myfedloan.org/help-center/faq/interest-faq.shtml

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After some research I found the word I was looking for. Using the third definition here

I might say my creditor has assessed interest.

I might also say interest has been assessed against my account.

From Dictionary.Com

Assess

verb (used with object)

  1. to estimate officially the value of (property, income, etc.) as a basis for taxation.
  2. to fix or determine the amount of (damages, a tax, a fine, etc.):The hurricane damage was assessed at six million dollars.
  3. to impose a tax or other charge on.
  4. to estimate or judge the value, character, etc., of; evaluate:to assess one's efforts.
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    I don't think that "assess" is the correct term for the context you are describing. – user66974 Mar 1 '16 at 20:11

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