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Things that can catch fire are called inflammable, similarly I want to know the word which describes things like wax or ice which melts as soon as temperature around them rises.

Thanks.

For example sentence let us agree that the word is 'meltable' but it does not satisfy my need.

Example- May be brotherhood is too 'meltable' to survive even couple of days under debris of burned buildings!!

  • 1
    You should really use "flammable" instead of "inflammable" since it's more clear. – Azor Ahai Feb 23 '16 at 19:34
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    Just about everything can melt, unless it sublimates, like "dry ice". Do you mean at room temperature? – Cascabel Feb 23 '16 at 20:03
  • easily meltable? – Grammar Addict Feb 23 '16 at 20:08
  • at not very high temprature may be like heating with a candle for a minute or so – Bhaskar Vashishth Feb 23 '16 at 20:29
  • Above comment re. "Easily meltable" could be tweaked to "tends to melt" – k1eran Feb 23 '16 at 22:47
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Meltable:

  • capable of melting.

The Free Dictionary

enter image description here

  • This doesn't include the 'readily' condition. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 23 '16 at 22:18
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Thermally unstable solid

Quoting from the book Guidelines for safe handling of of powders and bulk solids

Many unstable solids start to decompose as a result of a small heat input, e.g., friction. ...

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Deliquescent means "becoming liquid or having the tendency to become liquid" (here). Liquescent means the same thing.

You could use both of these words to describe butter or ice, but I am not sure about wax.

Fusible means "capable of being fused or melted easily" (here), but seems to be used largely for metals.

I also like @Josh61's suggestion of meltable. Although this might not mean, according to dictionary entries, easily or readily meltable, I'm sure a lot of people use it to mean this.

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The technical term for melt is liquefy, which can apply equally to solids turning liquid and gases turning liquid. (it is sometimes spelled liquify)

The OED entry says:

To reduce into a liquid condition. With obj. a solid substance; also in Physics, air, gases. †Formerly, to dissolve (in a liquid).

An example of each use is quoted here:

1863 J. Tyndall Heat (1870) ii. §21. 26 Simply to liquefy a mass of ice an enormous amount of heat is necessary.

1881 J. Lubbock Addr. Brit. Assoc. in Nature No. 618. 411 Oxygen and nitrogen have been liquefied.

So something that easily melts is liquefiable.

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    The leap from can melt to easily melts could use some explanation. – choster Feb 23 '16 at 23:57
  • @choster I believe the Op may have edited his question. He is now talking about things which melt as soon as the temperature around them rises. – WS2 Feb 24 '16 at 0:05
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The single word is, as Josh61 points out: meltable.

It's not easy IMO to run a single word through an Ngram up against several other phrases and not have it completely blow the scale. From this I deduce that just like you, others are willing to word at great length in order to avoid using it.

enter image description here

In short, no single word for you. There is another phrase that knocks all of these out of the park though:

easily melted

protected by MetaEd Jun 19 '18 at 14:58

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