1

I'm wondering how you understand the following sentence:

  1. There is a ten year time frame for the implementation of the new policies.

Does it mean that the new policies are supposed to be implemented during the time frame? Someone told me it means the policies are put into effect after the time frame.

Compare 1 with 2:

  1. There is a ten year time frame for the (completion of the) project.

Does 2 mean that the project is supposed to be completed during the time frame?

I'd appreciate your help.

1

Does it mean that the new policies are supposed to be implemented during the time frame? Someone told me it means the policies are put into effect after the time frame.

There is not necessarily a contradiction here. We know that the administrative and legislative preparations for the new policy need to be completed within ten years. But we cannot tell much more from the given sentence. It is possible that the policy will take effect in exactly ten years, or it may take effect earlier than that.

Can we infer that there is an interest to delay the policy? Or do we take it that the policy is attractive but difficult to implement? Our understanding of the sentence would differ depending on the answers. This is merely to say that the someone may have been correct with respect to the sentence's intended meaning. Without any further context, though, our interpretation has to be "within, and possibly before ten years have passed".

0

I think it means there is a ten-year window in which the policies have to be implemented. It certainly does not, for me, indicate they they can't be implemented before ten years have passed

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It means : "There is ten year for the implementation of the new policies !" Don't get lost with "frame". So it's within the 10 years : in the frame. To answer your question : it does mean the project is supposed to be completed during the time frame. If someone told you it means the policies are put into effect after the time frame, he did not understand. What we are framing is in, to focus inside the frame.

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