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I can't see the difference in meaning in the phrase below. Both are correct?

Cambridge is famous by its university.

Cambridge is famous for its university.

I found this phrase in a book named 'Essential Grammar in Use' Second edition (Murphy, Raymond) In this book the autor used 'for' in this context.

But there's a lot of references in internet using 'by' and it confuse me a lot.

There's an example using "by"

"Cambridge may be said to be sufficiently famous by its University"

Pigot and co.'s pocket atlas, topography and gazetteer of England by James Pigot (page 54)

https://books.google.com.br/books?id=RwgHAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA54&dq=cambridge+is+famous++%22by+its+university%22&hl=pt-BR&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiguNL184HLAhWCGpAKHejvAZIQ6AEIJTAA#v=onepage&q=cambridge%20is%20famous%20%20%22by%20its%20university%22&f=false

Could you guys help me to solve this doubt, please?

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Kristina Lopez, user140086, CDM, Peter Shor Feb 18 '16 at 16:23

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    The difference is that the second is grammatical while the first isn't. You can make the first grammatical by replacing "is famous" with "is made famous". – Lawrence Feb 18 '16 at 14:46
  • @Lawrence thank you! I updated the topic with another example I found in a book. "Cambridge may be said to be sufficiently famous by its University" It's the same case? – Björn Feb 19 '16 at 9:04
  • I have an idea about how by may be grammatical in the second example, but can't post an answer because your question was put on hold. You'll need to do some work first. To try to take the question off hold, I suggest you check standard references for the word "by", think about them, then edit your question to post your thoughts + links to the references you found. After that, you can go to the meta site to ask for your question to be reopened. This blog post may also be helpful. – Lawrence Feb 19 '16 at 10:20
  • ... Here's an example of a request to reopen a question. – Lawrence Feb 19 '16 at 10:37
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In the narrow case of the example provided, only for its is appropriate.

By as a preposition means "beside," "near," or "through the agency of." See M-W.

For in this instance is a preposition meaning "because of" or "with respect to". Again, see M-W

  • thank you! I updated the topic with another example I found in a book. "Cambridge may be said to be sufficiently famous by its University" It's the same case? – Björn Feb 19 '16 at 9:05

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