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Is "negotiation room" a correct expression? I'd like to use it in a sentence such as "there is still some room for negotiation on the terms and conditions." The idea is to show that we are still open to negotiate on some specific topics. Thank you in advance.

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    Can't tell without the context. Where and how is the expression used?
    – deadrat
    Feb 18 '16 at 4:32
  • Such as " there is still some room for negotiation on the terms and conditions", to show that we are still open to negotiate on some specific topics.
    – Rong Sun
    Feb 18 '16 at 4:35
  • Yes, That sentence is totally fine
    – Grizzly
    Feb 18 '16 at 4:36
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    There is a difference between "negotiation room" and "room for negotiation"; the second one is better than the first.
    – herisson
    Feb 18 '16 at 4:44
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    Is "negotiation room" a correct expression? Sure, it can be: The lawyers for both sides need to meet in the negotiation room. It's right across from the jury deliberation room – down this hallway, third door on the left. I'd like to use it in a sentence such as "there is still some room for negotiation on the terms and conditions." Oh. Well, that's something different altogether. A negotiation room is a room where people negotiate, but room for negotiation is what you describe: it shows we are still open to negotiate on certain topics. Maybe this would be better on English Language Learners?
    – J.R.
    Feb 18 '16 at 23:09
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A search for the phrase "some room for negotiation" in Google Books returns about 50 unique matches, while a search for the phrase "some negotiating room" returns about 45 unique matches; a search for the phrase "some room to negotiate" yields about 30 unique matches, as does a search for the phrase "some room for negotiating"; and a search for the phrase "some negotiation room" returns 20 unique matches.

So of the five options cited above, the most common ways of expressing this particular idea in books included in the Google Books database are "some room for negotiation" and "some negotiating room," and the least common way (by a considerable margin) is "some negotiation room."

Although (as commenters above suggest) either "negotiation room" or "negotiating room," when used by itself, may refer to the physical room where negotiations take place, I didn't see any instances in the search matches where either of the longer phrases "some negotiation room" and "some negotiating room" referred to such a physical space. It follows that you may use any of the five expressions listed in the first paragraph of my answer to fill in the blank in the clause "there is still ______________ on the terms and conditions," without fear of being misunderstood.

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