0

I am seeing that I often leave out copula when connecting two clauses. Like:

A notation is fixed but the performance variable.

I have the feeling this is a mistake coming from my German mother tongue. Is the previous sentence correct English, or should it rather repeat the 'is':

A notation is fixed but the performance is variable.

A second example:

The function may be written into the control component or visible from the outside.

vs.

The function may be written into the control component or be visible from the outside.

vs.

The function may be written into the control component or may be visible from the outside.

  • ... may either be written into the control, or visible from the outside? – Will Crawford Feb 16 '18 at 4:07
-3

A notation is fixed but the performance is variable. This is better, but still rather far from ideal.

Try this: Although a notation is fixed but the performance is variable.

[ 2 ] The function may be written into the control component or may be visible from the outside. The above is okay, but not 100% try this: The function may either be written into the control component or it be ensured that it is visible from the outside.

  • I'm not asking a stylistic question, but whether one can, technically, omit the verbs or not – 0__ Feb 17 '16 at 12:00
  • one can, technically, omit the verbs or not ? Answer, no one can not omit verbs in simple prose. Poets may use such liberty though. – Abhilaaj Feb 18 '16 at 16:32
  • In German you can, therefore I want a definite answer in English. I'm not omitting verbs, I'm omitting the repetition of verbs. This is for an academic text. – 0__ Feb 18 '16 at 18:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.