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Here are some examples of what I mean:

  • From Kate Chopin's The Awakening: "'You are burnt beyond recognition,' he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage." -- It sounds as if Chopin resents men like Mr. Pontellier who treat women as property; she subtly denounces this character in her narration.

  • Spoken by Marlow, From Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness: "'It was just robbery with violence, aggravated murder on a great scale, and men going at it blind...The conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it away from those who have a different complexion or slightly flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you look into it too much. What redeems it is the idea only. An idea at the back of it.'" -- Personally, I see Marlow as Conrad's puppet, his means of censuring the racist imperialists of his time. It's as if Conrad speaks through Marlow in a sort of sarcastic tone.

  • From John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath: "The driver sat in his iron seat and he was proud of the straight lines he did not will, proud of the tractor he did not own or love, proud of the power he could not control. And when that crop grew, and was harvested, no man had crumbled a hot clod in his fingers and let the earth sift past his fingertips. No man had touched the seed or lusted for the growth. Men ate what they had not raised, had no connection with the bread. The land bore under iron, and under iron gradually died; for it was not loved or hated, it had no prayers or curses." -- Clearly, Steinbeck disapproves of the modern technologies of his time. He sees tractors as cold, lifeless machines that rape the land and leave nothing behind but dust.

Is there a single word that could sum up this technique of incorporating your own thoughts and feelings into the narrative (and not writing in something personal, like second person point of view)?

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    Possibly something along the lines of insinuation/innuendo? I'm not sure there's really a one word for such a layered concept. – Adam Martin Feb 14 '16 at 19:33
  • I would say this in just defined as the "Author's Point of View". It can different from the "Narrator's Point of View". – Skooba Feb 15 '16 at 17:09
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I think the term you're looking for is bias.

In this case, it might be called literary bias, where an author shows a clear personal opinion in his work.

Other possible types of bias include but are not limited to journalistic bias, judicial bias, administrative bias, and artistic bias.

  • Not sure why I never accepted this. Sorry :) – AleksandrH Mar 22 '17 at 11:17
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Is there a single word that could sum up this technique of incorporating your own thoughts and feelings into the narrative (and not writing in something personal, like second person point of view)?

I would generally call this kind of narration "opinionated."

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