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As I am writing down my CV, there is a part where I am saying that I can deal with pressure and there are proofs about it.

So, I would like to squeeze that information in one line. As a result a word for replacing:

Able to deal with pressure = 'one word'

If it helps, I am in Computer Science. Relevant question for football: Who excels under pressure?

Wish I could summon an Ancient Spartan, which would find the laconic way into this, without having to trouble you

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    maybe resilient? :) – Armen Ծիրունյան Feb 13 '16 at 18:58
  • You should totally use "unflappable". – John Clifford Feb 13 '16 at 19:00
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    "baryspheric" . – Greg Lee Feb 13 '16 at 19:01
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    I would think "hydraulic engineer" would fit. – Hot Licks Feb 13 '16 at 20:08
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    CV's can get pompous. Just say it, that you can deal with pressure. "unflappable", "baryspheric(?)" and "resilient" might engender laughs where I work. – user116032 Feb 14 '16 at 1:58
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Equanimity should do the trick. Sentence:

While under pressure to complete your CV, you have approached the problem with equanimity.

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Consider imperturbable, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as follows:

imperturbable adj (15c) : marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and steadiness: SERENE

Note that impassivity is very different from passivity; it is far closer in sense to "maintaining a poker face, refraining from showing any emotion" (my wording). In distinguishing imperturbable from similar adjectives, the Eleventh Collegiate says this:

IMPERTURBABLE implies coolness or assurance even under severe provocation. {the speaker remained imperturbable despite the heckling}.

Other synonyms that the dictionary suggests are composed (in the sense of maintaining composure), collected, unruffled, and cool (under fire).

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Since we're talking about science, you might consider 'homeostatic;' its meaning is what you're looking for, and it's obviously a scientific term as well as a personality descriptor.

But for a resume, I really like the word 'unshakable:' it sounds very dynamic and cool, whereas words like 'poised' sound too graceful, and words like 'imperturable' and 'composed' make you sound nerdy or robotic.

(And by the way, the commenter who wrote 'clutch' for the excel-under-pressure football usage, in my opinion, nailed the three-pointer.)

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  • So you would write unshakable versus clutch, right? – gsamaras Feb 14 '16 at 20:26
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    For sure in this case. "Clutch" is strictly a sports-related word. – M. E. Feb 14 '16 at 20:39
  • You'd only use "clutch" if you knew you were giving the resume to a) a sports fan, and b) a person with a sense of humor, because it would be a very informal thing to do on a resume. – M. E. Feb 14 '16 at 20:40

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