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I have some problems in using the plural form of a uncountable noun. For instance:

"The density of all the solutions is measured."

or

"The densities of all the solutions are measured."

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

Sometimes I find that uncountable nouns are very confusing. I don't know when to use its plural form. (p/s:I'm not a native English speaker)

Thanks in advance.

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    "The density of each solution is measured" or "The densities of the solutions are measured". – Hot Licks Feb 10 '16 at 14:12
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    "The density of all the solutions is measured" would indicate that you were calculating the total density of all of them together. – John Clifford Feb 10 '16 at 14:13
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    Welcome to EL&U. Both density and solution are used as countable nouns here. – Lawrence Feb 10 '16 at 14:20
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This sentence is not correct."The density of all the solutions is measured." "all solutions" is not correct usage. The sentence "The densities of all the solutions are measured."looks fine, but rather odd. I would go far this: "The density of each and every solution used is measured."

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  • You don't really make a whole lot of sense to me. He's asking about density vs densities. – wvdz Feb 10 '16 at 14:40
  • Kindly refer your remark" He's asking about density vs densities." I did okay it by saying;"The sentence "The densities of all the solutions are measured."looks fine. I okay-ed the use of the plural densities. In addition I gave a better solution. Kindly see again. – Abhilaaj Feb 10 '16 at 14:42

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