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An analogy is used to explain some concepts, and the points of comparison are limited and contextual. What if I am extending that analogy way beyond the point where it makes sense. What is the word or phrase for this?

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    Have a look at the logical fallacy "extended analogy". Not exactly what you want but possibly close enough? I think people would know what you meant if you said someone "over extended the analogy" but it's not a common phrase, just a description. Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 16:31
  • Speculation? conjectural consideration of a matter.
    – user66974
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 16:33
  • @Hugh, I went through that, but thats way too theoretical for me. :)
    – VivekDev
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 16:51
  • A far-fetched analogy, perhaps.
    – Yay
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 17:04

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This is sometimes referred to as an overstretched or overblown analogy.

As an example, Leslie Evans' critique of The Soul of the Marionette: A Short Inquiry into Human Freedom, by John Gray, has:

Gray, in what I would regard as an overstretched analogy, regards as Gnostic modern scientific secularism's faith that ...

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  • +1. I don't know if analogies were strained more often in the past than they are today, or if we have become more accepting of the overstretched. books.google.com/ngrams/…
    – TimR
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 18:16
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    A stretched analogy is like silly putty. If you stretch it slowly, it will hold together and make sense. If you stretch it quickly, it will snap apart. Oh, and also if you press the analogy against newsprint, an image will be transferred.
    – James
    Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 20:29
  • @James +1. But I can't decide whether that's extremely deep or Grouchoesque. Commented Feb 10, 2016 at 10:24
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The Latin expression "Reductio ad absurdum" seems to cover this.

from Wikipedia:

that a false, untenable, or absurd result follows from its acceptance reductiones ad absurdum), also known as argumentum ad absurdum (Latin: "argument to absurdity", pl.: argumenta ad absurdum), is a common form of argument which seeks to demonstrate that a statement is true by showing that a false, untenable, or absurd result follows from its denial, or in turn to demonstrate that a statement is false by showing that a false, untenable, or absurd result follows from its acceptance.

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