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I came across an email mentioning : "We are pound to announce that .. (some good announcement)". Initially I thought it was a spelling mistake and they meant "proud" and not "pound". However, when I Googled, I saw many webpages having similar usage of "pound".

I understand the meaning of "pound" as a verb is to strike or to hit. However, I don't understand what's the meaning to this phrase: "to be pound of something".

What does it mean exactly? (and whether it's a correct usage at all)

  • I think that you have simply googled a common mistyping of the word proud or perhaps there is some auto-text correction program that converts a misspelling of proud into the word pound and people don't notice – Rolf of Saxony Feb 8 '16 at 9:58
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    There is no way that pound could be used in your example. Your initial thought is right. – user140086 Feb 8 '16 at 9:59
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    In Google, there are about 876 results with phrase showing "pound", compared to about 10,600,000 with the phrase showing "proud". In for a penny, in for a proud. – JEL Feb 8 '16 at 10:02
  • Googling "to be pound of" suggests - Did you mean "to be proud of"? – Pramod Karandikar Feb 8 '16 at 10:50
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Pound as a verb can also mean to shut in, to trap, though the more common verb is impound.

However neither meaning of the verb pound makes sense in this context. Looking at the first few results when I google "we are pound to", it is clear that the authors intended to write proud. As Rolf of Saxony says above,

"perhaps there is some auto-text correction program that converts a misspelling of proud into the word pound and people don't notice".

There is also this interesting case, where it appears that automatic character recognition has misread "we are bound to receive" (i.e. we are obliged) in the original printed text as "we are pound to receive".

  • That 'b' in your interesting case looks different from the one in the line above it. Dust, perhaps? It looks a little like the old letter thorn. – Lawrence Feb 8 '16 at 10:17

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