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Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right?

People exercising everyday are healthy.

or do I need to use who+conjugated verb?

People who exercise everyday are healthy.

Can present participle be used only to talk about specific things?

The boy eating the spaghetti is my brother.

  • Are you asking if it's syntactically correct or if it's right? – Hot Licks Feb 6 '16 at 18:57
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People exercising everyday are healthy.

This implies that "people" are healthy while exercising everyday, but not necessarily when they stop exercising.

People who exercise everyday are healthy.

This is more idiomatic. But "everyday" is an adjective/adverb, whereas you really want a noun as the object of "exercise". So it should be:

People who exercise every day are healthy.

Almost. Exercising every day does not, in the real world, guarantee health. About all one can really say is:

People who exercise every day are healthier [than those who don't].

(And that comes with a few caveats.)

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    Hi, HotLicks. Why would you really want a noun as the object of to exercise when it could be used intransitively. If you replace every day with adverbs like regularly, daily or on a daily basis, it still makes sense. – user140086 Feb 7 '16 at 4:26
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I think "People who exercise every day are healthy." is the correct wording.

Also, note that it's "every day", not "everyday."

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