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One of the engineers who design those programs is visiting with us today?

or

One of the engineers who designs those programs is visiting with us today?

  • One of those program design engineers is visiting us today. Visit with someone sounds like southern or regional AE. – Lambie Feb 2 '16 at 20:07
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Depends on the meaning!

(a)"One of the engineers who design those programs is visiting us today."

The relative clause specifies which group of 'the engineers' is referred to, here: the ones that "design those programs".

(b) "One of the engineers, who designs those programs, is visiting us today."

The relative clause gives additional information about 'one of the engineers'. You could then say: One of the engineers, who BY THE WAY designs those programs (...). The commas are obligatory!

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I would say:

One of the engineers designing those programs is visiting us today.

If you must include who, it should be:

One of the engineers who designs those programs is visiting us today.

The subject is singular, therefore, the verb should agree with one.

NOTE: I deleted the with because the engineers are not going somewhere with you, they are visiting you. If they are going someplace with you, you should say where you guys are visiting:

... visiting [insert person/place to be visited] with us.

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  • On the matter of the with - in Britain we never visit with people. Visit is always a transitive verb - we visit the relatives; we do not visit with them. Are you British too? Or are you saying that in America, visit can be used transitively, as well as intransitively. For in the UK if we visit with someone, it means we take them somewhere e.g. I am going to visit my aunt, with my brother. – WS2 Feb 2 '16 at 19:10
  • @WS2 I'm American and I agree with you. I thought the the OP meant the one of the engineers is visiting his company, so I deleted the with. – SunnyHills Feb 2 '16 at 19:33
  • No. See Sash's answer. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 2 '16 at 20:39
  • @WS2 - In parts of the US we do "visit with" others. The expression is synonymous with "converse." It's probably euphemistic in origin. So much for the illusion of a common language! – Rob_Ster Feb 2 '16 at 20:47

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