0

Should "no one" be followed by the singular or plural form of "like"? I know that "no one" is generally followed by singular verbs, but would being preceded by a plural noun make this an exception?

closed as off-topic by user140086, anongoodnurse, ab2, Nathaniel, Dan Bron Feb 3 '16 at 16:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

The finite verb form depends on the subject and the numerus of an object is irrelevant.

  • He likes the book Hunger Games - He likes the books by Suzanne Collins.

Even if the object is in front position it has no influence on the finite verb form.

1

"No one" is followed by singular verbs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indefinite_pronoun#Table_of_indefinite_pronouns

  • Would being preceded by a plural noun make this an exception? – paulathekoala Feb 2 '16 at 6:33
  • Not at all, no, they're part of two different phrases. You can invert it to make more sense out of it: "No one likes the fruit" vs "No one like the fruit" – Tyress Feb 2 '16 at 6:40

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.