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Good evening! I began to learn English and I am wonder if there is any difference between the phrases "leave the house" and "leave home" (the context is "Usually I get up at 7 o'clock and leave home/the house at 9 o'clock). Perhaps, my question is strange, but, please answer it.

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Leave the house

implies a temporary state: you have left the house for now, but will be back at some point in the near future (so this would be fine if you were going to school, or work, or the shops etc.)

Leave home

Has a more permanent connotation and implies that you are moving out permanently to a new address.

The main reason for this nuance is the subtle difference between "house" and "home" at least where I'm from. As covered in another question on this SE, "house" refers to the building, while "home" has a much more personal meaning.

  • True, but I agree with Rob_Ster in that leave home is not restricted to the sense you note. It's rather unremarkable in my circles to ask When do you leave home in the morning? in conversations about our horrible commutes, – choster Feb 1 '16 at 19:23
  • Yeah, I should probably have specified that they were also interchangeable despite the different connotations. – John Clifford Feb 2 '16 at 9:05
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In the context you describe, the phrases are interchangeable. They have the same meaning.

However, in a different context "to leave home" could denote a permanent removal from one's domicile. Children leave home when they reach independent adulthood.

They leave the house at 7:00 to go to school, but could also be said to "leave home at 7:00." It seems to me that "leaving home" might have a connotation of an action more indurated by routine or gravity, but that may be idiosyncratic and not supported by the community at large.

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No real difference.I believe that the difference is leave the house is generally used when leaving a house that is not yours. Leaving home is when you leave where you live. Also it's how you were raised.

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