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The sentence:

Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them.

Is it to be able or being able?

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    What exactly is the difference between the "ability to be able to deal with something" and the "ability to deal with something"? Can I have one without the other? Jan 31, 2016 at 16:11
  • @PeterShor What about "Having the ability to deal with them"?
    – shotdown
    Jan 31, 2016 at 16:17
  • There are lots of ways to reword your sentence so as to get rid of the awkward and redundant "ability to be able to", and that one's fine. Jan 31, 2016 at 17:44

1 Answer 1

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"The ability to be able" is still a bit redundant, right? How about these examples?

"Happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather" being able to deal with them.

Or,

"Happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather" having the ability to deal with them.

Either of these examples is grammatically correct and avoids the redundancy. Good luck!

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  • Thank you for your answer. I have submitted the full sentence in an edit above, hope that clarifies it up a bit.
    – shotdown
    Jan 31, 2016 at 16:07
  • Excellent. I have edited my answer accordingly. I hope it helps. :-) Jan 31, 2016 at 16:17

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