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Can we use 'because' in the following sentence:

[After discussing the behavior of a technique T] We believe this drop is because T fails to find the right number of classifiers to include in the final ensemble.

Here I am trying to explain a behavior discussed in the previous paragraph.

Is this correct? If no, any suggestion?

  • I’d probably say something more like. “We believe this drop arises because T fails to find the right...”. Or occurs. Or, “We believe we get this drop because T fails to find...” – Jim Jan 30 '16 at 19:31
  • @Jim, That sounds perfect. – Hadjer Jan 30 '16 at 19:36
3

/We believe this drop occurs because/ OR /We believe this drop comes from the fact/ or /We believe the drop is due to/. OR /We believe the drop is due to T failing to etc./ but not: This behavior is because, that is not grammatical. This behavior is due to [y]

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"We believe this drop is because T fails to find the right number of classifiers to include in the final ensemble."

This is correct usage of "because" as long as "T" is responsible for the "drop." If you mean something else, then we would need more information in order to answer your question.

  • The previous paragraph reported a drop in the performance of the technique T. After some analysis and comparison, I came up with this explanation (T fails to find the right number of classifiers to include in the final ensemble). What d you think? – Hadjer Jan 30 '16 at 19:34
  • Then the sentence as you've written it is correct. Good job! – Mark Hubbard Jan 30 '16 at 23:14
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T's failure to find the right number of classifiers to include in the final ensemble is what has caused the drop in ... [whatever].

  • Here I am claiming the cause of the drop, not stating it. If I was 100% of the cause, your answer will do the job. – Hadjer Jan 30 '16 at 19:50

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