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Husband asked, "Do you think it's true that men use 15,000 words a day and women use double?"

The wife replied, "I think so, The reason has to be because we have to repeat everything to men."

Is "the reason has to be because" a common usage in colloquial conversations?

Another question!

Does "A have to be B" mean the strong guess(A must be B or I'm sure A is B)?

I learned "the reason is because S+V" is grammatically wrong (although many people use it) as far as I remember my SAT writing class materials correctly.

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, ab2 ReinstateMonicaNow, user140086, Drew, Community Jan 28 '16 at 3:37

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  • With regard to your second question, "have to be" = "must be." At face value, it expresses certainty, not merely high probability; but both "have to be" and "must be" are frequently used in exaggeration or hyperbole. – Sven Yargs Jan 28 '16 at 1:38
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Is "the reason has to be because" a common usage in colloquial conversations?

It may be a common usage, but it's ungrammatical. Because is used between two propositions, to justify the first as a result of the truth of the second - I went to London because I wanted to visit X or She is not a good guitarist because she hardly ever practises.

The reason has to be is not a complete proposition.

To be properly grammatical, the sentence should be should be written as The reason has to be that..., or alternatively Women use double because...

But there's nothing wrong with The reason has to be as a phrase. You could replace has to with must but it wouldn't alter the meaning.

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I don't see any wrong to this sentence. There are several ways to express it. Here are two of them:

1.The reason is that we have to repeat everything to men. 2. The reason has to be for that you are talking me about because we have to repeat everything to men.

for that you are talking me about - this part of speech is meant by. 
I hope it helps. 

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