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In Bertrand Russell's autobiography, there is a sentence that reads, in part:

My dream on her birthday; my subsequent discovery that my people had deceived me as in that dream; their solemn and reiterated warnings; the gradual discovery, one by one, of the tragedies, hopeless and unalleviated, which have made up the lives of most of my family; above all perpetual gloom which hangs like a fate over Pembroke Lodge, and which, struggle as I will, invades my inmost soul whenever I go there,taking all joy even out of Alys's love;...

What's the meaning of "struggle as I will"? What's the structure of this sentence?

Is "Pembroke Lodge" the subject of the last sentence?

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    Since you haven't provided the complete sentence—or even the complete clause that begins with "above all," it is impossible to identify the structure of the sentence as a whole; but the thing "which, struggle as I will, invades..." is gloom, not Pembroke Lodge.
    – Sven Yargs
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 19:32
  • I altered the format coding to hide the URL (to make the question more readable). But even with the full text now available one click away, it might make sense to include more of the original sentence in the block quote in your question, to make this page, in effect, a one-stop shop for prospective answerers.
    – Sven Yargs
    Commented Jan 28, 2016 at 5:58

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He saying something akin to "despite my best efforts to keep the gloom from affecting me".

above all perpetual gloom which hangs like a fate over Pembroke Lodge, and which, despite my best efforts to keep the gloom from affecting me, invades my inmost soul whenever I go there, ...

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