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A: Are you saying accepting your help obligates me?

B: ls there any other way to see it?

A: No.

I found this line from the movie, As Good As It Gets, and I'm curious about this phrase "Is there any other way to see it".

Does it mean 'please don't distort my intention. Please see it in other ways'?

  • B is saying "Not only am I not helping you for free, as far as I'm concerned 'free' doesn't exist." – Joe L. Jan 24 '16 at 2:41
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I found the conversation @ imdb.com. It sounds to me like Carol asked a question, and Melvin's answer was essentially "yes." But rather than say yes, he wanted to say "Of course!"

And that appears to be what "Is there any other way to see it" means - "of course. He could have also said any of the following:

  1. Is there another way of interpreting my words?

  2. What else could anyone think I meant?

  3. Why is that so hard to understand?

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As always, context is everything. "A" here is the character Carol Connelly (Helen Hunt), and "B" is the character Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) in the film As Good As It Gets. Udall is an obsessive compulsive whose mental problems have stunted him emotionally, making it impossible for him to relate to other people.

When Carol asks Melvin whether her accepting his help obligates her, she's being incredulous. In normal human interaction, people often offer their help to others freely. But Melvin, not having normal emotional capacity, not only thinks that Carol's accepting his help obligates her to him, he can't think of any other possibility.

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