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This question already has an answer here:

Ok, I know I already asked this stuff but I thought that I should've organized it. So here it goes. By the way, quick shout out to people who answered my original question. I guess it was off-topic but I just wanted answers for something I've been wondering for a while. Also this is my first day on stack exchange. Sorry this is long: 1. Is saying "come on" and "let me" rude. And I mean let me in a way like "let me see that" and "let me have your phone". 2. If it is rude to say commands without please,then why do people do it so often. (And I mean certain commands. Like, ones where please could be added appropriately) 3. Am I the only person who does say let me and come on? Also I don't use imperatives that much. I usually rephrase them to be statements and questions. Is that weird?

marked as duplicate by Drew, ab2, user140086, anongoodnurse, Mazura Jan 23 '16 at 11:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    "Let me see that" is an imperative statement. But an enormous amount of how such things are perceived has to do with the tone of voice. – Hot Licks Jan 23 '16 at 0:24
  • Wow, I wasn't trying to be annoying I just thought I should have organized my question better. @Hot Licks – Pinkcat2244 Jan 23 '16 at 0:30
  • Hi, Pinkcat, you seem to have two user accounts. Please visit the link and try to merge the two accounts if you want. – user140086 Jan 23 '16 at 3:12
  • You should be aware that "come on" has two distinct meanings: One is for cheering someone to victory or achieving a goal: "Come on, keep going, you can do it." The other is an expression of frustration. When you're trying to watch TV and a family member stands between you and the TV and starts searching for something on the coffee table, you say, "Come on. I'm trying to watch something here." The first is never rude, but the second might be. – Steven Littman Jan 23 '16 at 3:47
  • Whether it’s rude or just informal depends on the relationship between the speaker and the recipient. – Jim Jan 23 '16 at 4:31
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The answer is all over the map. Also, I'm not sure if it's a question about language so much as behavior.

Anyway, the answer is "it depends."

If a stranger walked up to me and said "Let me see your map," I'd be offended. In fact, I'd probably back away while bracing myself for a possible fight with a man who might be a weirdo or trouble-maker.

But if you're working on a construction project with a friend you've know for years, do you really want to say "please" every time you need to make a simple command or request?

People are especially apt to dispense with "please" in potentially dangerous situations (e.g. construction sites, the scene of an accident, etc.). There's a lot of tension in the air, and people generally just say what needs to be said as briefly as possible.

My job is actually semi-dangerous, and I get offended very easily by co-workers who tell me to do something without adding "please," "would you mind," etc.

In summary, the answer depends largely on familiarity (friend vs stranger) and the context (e.g. casual conversation vs the scene of an accident).

In numerical order...

  1. Saying "come on" and "let me" may or may not be rude, depending largely on the context. There are also situations where one person might consider it rude while another might consider it OK.

  2. Why do people say these things? That's all over the map. Some people are just rude, while others may not realize they're being rude.

  3. "Am I the only person who does say let me and come on?"

Of course not.

  • Thanks a lot David. This is super weird but whenever I hear someone say a command without a please or do what and rephrase it just sounds negative. I know I'm just being stupid but I watched a bunch of nick jr. in my past so I think it got to me. Haha. Also it would be great if anyone answers each of my questions in number order. You don't have to, I'm just saying. I'm just hope I'm not the only one. – Pinkcat2244 Jan 23 '16 at 0:36

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