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Currently reading "Taiwan's brain drain prompts worries," by Austin Ramzy from International New York Times (January 14, 2016), I came across the following sentence:

but I do not see the D.P.P. being able to, or promoting, a radical overhaul of the economy.

My instinct says it means, "but I do not see the D.P.P. being able to promote a radical overhaul of the economy nor actually promoting it."

However, since "or promoting" is inserted--and separated by a set of commas--shouldn't it be grammatically correct even after it's removed?

But then,"I do not see the D.P.P. being able to a radical overhaul of the economy" doesn't make grammatical sense to me. I've never seen a noun or noun phrase after "able to."

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    The writer meant to say, "but I do not see the DPP being able to promote, or promoting..." Even the Times makes errors. In fact, they make a lot of them, and there is a web article on their site every Tuesday called After Deadline about the grammar, usage and stylistic errors that were caught after it was too late. – Steven Littman Jan 20 '16 at 19:41
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    It's anacoluthon. – Colin Fine Jan 20 '16 at 21:38
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    Definitely not well-written. – Hot Licks Jan 20 '16 at 22:29
  • Actually, to my ear the author actually means this: but I do not see the D.P.P. being able to perform, or even promoting, a radical overhaul of the economy. – Tim Ward Jan 20 '16 at 22:57
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I agree that your final interpretation (which would be correct from the grammar used) doesn't make any sense.

In addition to being grammatically poor, I think the original sentence is also ambiguous. My initial interpretation was like this:

I do not see the D.P.P. being able to radically overhaul the economy, nor do I see them promoting a radical overhaul of the economy.

But your interpretation is also valid, given the poor way it is presented. The correct way to express that interpretation would be:

I do not see the D.P.P. being able to promote, or promoting a radical overhaul of the economy.

However, this is confusing because if they are unable, how could they promote it? Perhaps the author means:

I do not see the D.P.P. being able to promote a radical overhaul of the economy, and even if they were able to, I do not see them doing it.

Anyway, the answer to the title of your question is no. You can't formally put a noun after "being able to", you should put an action.

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