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The two have opposite meanings yet the prefixes are almost synonyms.

  • No, the prefixes, price and worth are not almost synonyms. – Drew Jan 15 '16 at 2:33
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By the 1590s, priceless took on its modern meaning of having a value beyond price.

This makes sense because if I said to you,

"This object has no price."

the implication is that the object has no price because it is not for sale, and it is not for sale because I cannot put a price on something so important or meaningful.

But, if I said to you,

"This object has no worth."

the implication is that the object has no value, the object has zero significance or meaning to me.

In short, price and worth are not in fact synonymous. Therefore, price-less (without price) and worth-less (without worth) are not synonymous, either.

(Online Etymology Dictionary)

  • Price and worth are almost synonyms. Price- value and worth-value – Goldname Jan 15 '16 at 0:54
  • Oxford Dictionaries Online defines price as "the amount of money expected, required, or given in payment for something." Worth is defined as "the value equivalent to that of someone or something under consideration; the level at which someone or something deserves to be valued or rated." One is a tangible measure of money, the other an intangible measure of value. – Kyle Jan 15 '16 at 1:04
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    @Goldname in English, price and worth are not almost synonyms. – michael_timofeev Jan 15 '16 at 2:00
  • While I agree that the two quoted sentences have the implications you say now, I strongly suspect that that's because of the influence of the current meanings of "priceless" and "worthless". That they have those implications now doesn't explain how they came to have them. Also, the meanings in both "What's it worth?" and "What is it's price" are almost identical. – TripeHound Apr 18 '18 at 14:13

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