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If a legal matter is votable, it is capable of being voted upon. What, then, is a voucher, or a stock certificate, that is capable of being used to vote?

Is that thing still votable; i.e., is this another sense of that same word?

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    Yes, but it's not the certificate that's called votable, it's the shares that the certificate represent thart are votable. The certificate simply proves you own the votable shares. For example here's some lines from an SEC filing that talks about votable shares: Also includes 2,930 restricted shares which are votable by the individual – Jim Jan 3 '16 at 0:55
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    @Jim I believe the term is voting shares, at least that is the case in Britain. You are talking here about what UK Company Law describes as Ordinary Shares, and in the United States is known as Common Stock. One of the key features of both Ordinary Shares and Common Stock is that they carry the right to vote. So a good generic term that might be applied generally across different jurisdictions is voting shares. In many years in the accountancy profession I do not recall any use of the term votable shares. Indeed my spell-checker underlines it in red. – WS2 Jan 3 '16 at 1:03
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    @WS2- I have also heard the term voting shares. Nevertheless, here's another filing that uses "votable": Shares Voted: 6,550,463 Votable Shares: 6,550,463 – Jim Jan 3 '16 at 1:08
  • @WS2- accountancy Eh? Have you ever wanted to be a lion tamer? – Jim Jan 3 '16 at 1:09
  • @Jim I looked at that but I think it is wrong. It doesn't matter because everyone understands what it means. It is interesting that Wikipedia redirects Votable shares to Voting interests. – WS2 Jan 3 '16 at 9:47
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ballot definition:

The piece of paper used to record someone’s vote.

Edit:

In response to OP's comment, I would use the adjectives unmarked or blank to indicate that a ballot, for example, is able to be used to vote.

Edit:

In response to Jim's comment, I would recommended identification, or, identifying.

  • That's the noun, what is the adjective that makes it such a noun? A stock certificate, for example, can both grant or deny voting rights so a stock certificate that does grant voting rights is "what"? Votable? – acidgate Jan 3 '16 at 0:48
  • @Kyle- Unfortunately that's not what the OP's after. Yes, you can literally vote on the ballot, but OP is asking for the term for something (like a stock certificate) that proves you have the right to vote. In other words, you use it when you vote to prove you are allowed to do so. – Jim Jan 3 '16 at 1:17
  • Classes of equity which confer the right to vote on the holder are called voting stock. – StoneyB on hiatus Jan 3 '16 at 1:30
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A share of some company that one owns may be defined as voting or non-voting under the terms of its issuance. "Preferred" shares, which typically get paid a fixed dividend before regular shares, are commonly non-voting.

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