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I read a book and am stuck with a particular sentence:

One other significant change is that the Pentium Pro processor uses three execution engines, so it can execute up to three instructions at a time, which can conflict and still execute in parallel.

I understand the meaning till "three instructions at a time".

What does the rest of sentence mean?

I think it means that when instructions have a conflict, they execute in parallel. Am I right? Is it possible to translate this into something simpler?

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    The three instructions can conflict between each other. Despite this, they still will be executed in a parallel manner. The conflict will not prevent their parallel execution. – CowperKettle Dec 31 '15 at 16:56
  • You can't really understand this without understanding the general concept of a "multiprocessor" computer. And the part about "conflict" gets real messy real fast. – Hot Licks Dec 31 '15 at 20:24
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Here's a simple rewrite that avoids separating the "which" from its referent (by avoiding the "which" :-)

One other significant change is that the Pentium Pro processor uses three execution engines, so it can execute up to three instructions in parallel, even if they conflict with each other.

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One other significant change is that the Pentium Pro processor uses three execution engines, so it can execute up to three instructions at a time, which can conflict and still execute in parallel.

As @CopperKettle says,

Even if the three instructions conflict with each other, they will still be executed parallely

or

I'd put it this way:

Regardless of conflicts, the three instructions will be executed in parallel.

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