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I can think only of havoc. What other things can be wrought in the present tense?

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    Mayhem and destruction come to mind. – Kit Z. Fox Dec 17 '15 at 3:49
  • Wreak vengeance – user140086 Dec 17 '15 at 3:52
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    I've seen some posts here that wreaked of lousy spelling. – Hot Licks Dec 17 '15 at 3:56
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    As an aside, as per the online Oxford Dictionary: The phrase wrought havoc, as in they wrought havoc on the countryside, is an acceptable variant of wreaked havoc. Here, wrought is an archaic past tense of work. It is not, as is sometimes assumed, a past tense of wreak. – Steven Littman Dec 17 '15 at 4:01
  • @StevenLittman The confusion may be due to the similarity between wrought (archaic past participle of work) and wroke (strong past tense of wreak). Wreak once followed the same paradigm as modern speak. – Anonym Dec 18 '15 at 0:36
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A search for the collocate wreak [noun] on the Corpus of Contemporary American English (1990–2012) turns up the following results and relative frequencies (#5 and #6 being obvious typos):

  1. HAVOC 425
  2. VENGEANCE 15
  3. DESTRUCTION 7
  4. REVENGE 5
  5. HAVOE 1
  6. HAVOC.WHETHER 1
  7. BRUTALITIES 1
  8. CATASTROPHE 1
  9. TURMOIL 1
  10. HORROR 1
  11. CHAOS 1
  12. HARM 1
  13. TERROR 1
  14. DESERT 1
  15. DAMAGE 1
  16. BUDGET 1
  17. VIOLENCE 1

In the British National Corpus, the results are similar:

  1. HAVOC 37
  2. VENGEANCE 7
  3. REVENGE 4
  4. MAYHEM 2
  5. PUNISHMENT 1
  6. MAGIC 1
  7. INHUMANITY 1
  8. DESTRUCTION 1

The Corpus of Historical American English (1810–2009) also favors havoc and vengeance by a wide margin, with vengeance appearing earliest, but havoc becoming dramatically popular in the postwar years:

  1. HAVOC 72
  2. VENGEANCE 45
  3. REVENGE 7
  4. DESTRUCTION 4
  5. EVIL 2
  6. VIOLENCE 2
  7. TURMOIL 1
  8. SUMMARY 1
  9. REVENGES 1
  10. HORROR 1
  11. DEVASTATION 1
  12. DESERT 1
  13. CHAOS 1
  14. BRUTALITIES 1
  15. AFTER-VENGEANCE 1

Searching on wreaking and other forms seems to indicate that just about anything negative can be wreakedcarnage, injustice, disruption, plague, etc. But I don't have time to research if there's any particular reason why havoc, vengeance / revenge, and mayhem rose to the top.

As to budget and the like, the oddities mostly arise from their use as attributives; thus they are classified as a noun, but the direct object of wreak lies beyond— wreak budget disaster, wreak summary vengeance, etc. It can also arise where a following noun is not the direct object, for example where the infinitive to wreak is used: His parents were away for the long weekend, and with three days of havoc to wreak, teenagers soon flooded the tiny bungalow.

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