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Atypical, so far as I know, means irregular, unusual or not typical/normal. Here in India, people generally use 'typical' to mean difficult or hard. (A question about that was also asked here some four years back by an Indian.) I understand now that typical cannot be used in that sense. But on that note, can 'atypical' be used to mean difficult or hard? For example,

The teacher dictated the whole passage orally, but wrote some atypical words on blackboard.
Her new song is quite atypical. (in the sense of being difficult to sing)

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    Perhaps some Indians who don't really speak English very well have simply conflated atypical with the idiomatic use of unusual - a common word that in context (such as both of your examples) may be taken to imply "little-known, [hence] difficult". But in general if someone chooses to use the less common atypical that's because they don't really want that particular association. An example may be dismissed as "atypical", so it doesn't affect the validity of some general principle, say - it's not "hard", just "irrelevant". – FumbleFingers Dec 15 '15 at 18:58
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    The only way I can see atypical being used to denote "difficult" would be through context. Just because something is unusual doesn't mean it will be more difficult. It can mean that though, if a test is written using atypical words and the test taker doesn't understand... that would make the test more difficult. – Keeleon Dec 15 '15 at 19:09
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    This question can be answered with a dictionary. – nollidge Dec 15 '15 at 19:15
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    When someone says "typical" in your dialect, is it with a feeling of exasperation? ("I had to fly back to India and spent a full day waiting for my passport stamp." "Typical.") If there's a sense of irony behind the word, that might explain how "typical" received a "difficult" connotation. – rajah9 Dec 15 '15 at 21:29
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    @Jatin: This is getting really confusing! Can you please edit your question text (or title) so we know for sure whether you're asking about typical or atypical? Many Anglophones often use Typical! as an exclamatory expression of exasperation (with the sense of Your lack of co-operation is just what I would expect from you!, for example). An awful lot of those people won't even know the word atypical, which is orders of magnitude less common. – FumbleFingers Dec 16 '15 at 16:04
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No.

In a comment, rajah9 gave an example of having to wait a day for a passport stamp. When someone characterizes a full-day wait for a passport stamp as typical, it is not to say that the wait was difficult or hard. Rather, it means that the wait exemplifies the inefficiency of the border agency, or of some other aspect of the trip.

In other words, despite the wait having been unfortunate and wrong it was not unusual, or at least not unexpected.

As Keelon notes, in your test example, atypical does not mean "difficult" or "hard"; it means unusual. The implication of difficulty arises from the context. Someone might just as well find atypical items in a shopping bag without any implication of difficulty.

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