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Because while that is technically the correct spelling for each word, but as a phrase it doesn't seem to work well together. It lacks symmetry (Hippie vs. Dippy) and uses the extremely rare-yet-proper Italian "bologna".

Origin: The phrase is used with delightful comic effect in The Lego Movie and quoted on wikiquote as "hippie, dippy baloney".

Consider:

The question is: How best to spell "Hippie-Dippie Baloney"?

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  • 1
    Spell it however you like. Plenty of people use the spelling hippy, and even more use boloney rather than baloney (or your supposedly "correct" bologna). Dec 14, 2015 at 17:59
  • 1
    Hippie-dippie has been around longer than The Lego Movie. There must be some kind of conventional spelling for it, I should think. Also, seems like it is a compound word rather than something one might think of spelling separately, like a whatdoyoucallit phrasal repeat like "thingy-dingy".
    – Kit Z. Fox
    Dec 14, 2015 at 18:07

2 Answers 2

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The case for Hippy Dippy Balony: the spelling of hippy with a final y predates the spelling ending ie:

One of the earliest attestations of the term hippy is found in the "Dictionary of Hip Words and Phrases" included in the liner notes for the 1959 comedy album How to Speak Hip, a parody based on the burgeoning Greenwich Village scene.
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_hippie)

Further it is clearly an adjective. Hippy is also a valid adjective in every dictionary I checked, meaning "having big hips." Further, the word hippy in the phrase is clearly an adjective.

"Balony" is the best way to spell baloney/bologna because to spell it correctly would be like spelling out "OK" as "okae".

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  • Plus "Hippy" is pleasantly similar to "Gypsy". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
    – BrianOFlan
    Dec 14, 2015 at 23:48
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    Alas, I cannot mark this answer as the answer because of its treatment of "balony"/baloney/bologna. Compare baloney to balony. (How strange that boloney is fine but not balony/bolony.)
    – BrianOFlan
    Dec 14, 2015 at 23:50
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On the Warner Home Video DVD release, the English subtitles render it

hippie-dippie baloney

(But, perhaps the subtitles do not represent the intended or scripted spelling.)

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