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The following is an excerpt from a newspaper article. What do "the best of both worlds" and "young minds" mean in this context?

Not only do these standing desks improve focus but they can also have positive health benefits as well, which really brings the best of both worlds when it comes to young minds.

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In this context, focus is often associated with stillness, while health is associated with exercise. The contrast between stillness and exercise (movement) leads to the assumption that they tend to be mutually exclusive - two separate worlds, as it were. (The assumption is erroneous, of course, as athletes would attest, but I'm just referring to the apparent dichotomy.)

The term best of both worlds is an idiom meaning simultaneously enjoying the best parts of two different activities / situations / etc. In this case, it is referring to the claim that standing (at a standing desk) improves focus as well as promotes health, presumably when compared to sitting at a more traditional desk.

Young minds likely refers to the children for whom the standing desks are intended. The phrase uses a figure of speech called synecdoche, in which a reference to a portion of something references the whole - in this case, young minds refers to young people.

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Not only do these standing desks improve focus but they can also have positive health benefits as well, which really brings the best of both worlds when it comes to young minds.

This sounds exactly like a media release (Public Relations release) from the importer or marketer of the standing desk. Often such "blurb" is simply reproduced in newspapers as if it is "news".

... really brings the best of both worlds when it comes to young minds.

This is an inelegant mix of two idioms, but it is grammatically correct - just. The more common expressions are "represents the best of both worlds", or "have the best of both worlds", or simply "is the best of both worlds" - it is not something that anyone normally "brings" anywhere, or "to" anyone.

Also, there is no evidence provided that "young minds" are going to benefit from this "best of both worlds" claim more than - say - older minds would. And yes, the writer has used synecdoche, presumably because it sounds more romantic or caring than simply saying "young people".

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