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I framed two sentences, one using infinitive and another using gerund. Which of the two sounds more correct?

Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, it will, at least, not run in the background.

Although the app will continue occupying the storage space, it will, at least, not run in the background.

Are both the sentences correct?

closed as primarily opinion-based by michael_timofeev, choster, Marv Mills, Nathaniel, Mitch Dec 11 '15 at 16:12

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    Both are fine, but like @Cargill in his comment to an answer below the sentence construction is a little awkward. I would consider revising your use of commas. – Jascol Dec 10 '15 at 10:54
  • @Jascol I suppose I should remove "at least" from the sentence. "Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, it will not run in the background." – Ashish Singh Dec 10 '15 at 11:16
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    that reads better. You could have also put the "at least" (adverbial phrase) at the beginning of the clause. i.e. "Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, at least it will not run in the background." – Jascol Dec 10 '15 at 16:46
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Both are correct and have the same meaning, though using the gerund form is considered more eloquent. I find that Practical English Usage (Swan ch.296) is excellent at explaining the rules for using infinitive or gerund.

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Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, it will, at least, not run in the background.

Although the app will continue occupying the storage space, it will, at least, not run in the background.

When I read your first sentence, I understand;

The app was disrupted (stopped working). However the situation is fixed and the app will continue to occupy.

When I read your second sentence, I understand;

The app was not disrupted (continues working). There is nothing to fix but only a change in how the app is running.

  • Any edits are welcomed, typing this in a hurry. – Grizzly Dec 10 '15 at 9:14
  • I don't understand your answer very well, and I especially disagree that there are two different interpretations of the two sentences ... to me the meanings are the same. However I do consider the construction of the sentences to be awkward and unnecessarily hard to read / scan. – Cargill Dec 10 '15 at 10:23

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