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Nearly all of the editors of the magazine agree that of the two articles to be published, Fujimura's is the more exciting.

Shouldn't it be "the more exciting one"?

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  • I guess it is understood even without mentioning one at the end.
    – BiscuitBoy
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 6:32
  • It is extremely common in English for "understood" words not to be written or said. And often the flow of the language is much better without the additional words. So your sample sentence is completely okay.
    – Cargill
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 6:39

1 Answer 1

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You don't need to use one as not using it is idiomatic. The definite article the is used before a comparative when you compare two things or people and usually of the two is used or omitted at the end.

Nearly all of the editors of the magazine agree that of the two articles to be published, Fujimura's is the more exciting (of the two).

Of the two is omitted because it was used before.

Other examples:

This book is the more interesting of the two.
Who is taller, Tom or Dick? Tom is the taller of the two.

You don't use one in the above examples.

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  • Just to clarify the definite article "the" is not required in the sample sentences, in order to retain common idiomatic form. You could say: Who is taller, Tom or Dick? Tom is taller. In this form however, there are no understood words omitted.
    – Cargill
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 7:02
  • @Cargill Yes, people would have no problem in understanding Tom is taller. The OP asks if one should be used and I am explaining that it shouldn't be used.
    – user140086
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 7:12
  • And I am assisting in that explanation, with some clarification.
    – Cargill
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 7:39

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