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But most importantly, your philosophy of XXX is what is the most appealing to me.

I am doing some formal writing. I need to express both the meaning of "most importantly" and "most appealing" in this sentence, but I cannot find a way to avoid this repetition of "most".

Any help is appreciated.

1

You could consider using other phrases to replace most importantly, i.e. above all (else) which means:

More so than anything else [Oxford Online Dictionary], most of all; especially [Collins Online Dictionary]

Another good candidate is first and foremost which means:

Primarily; most importantly.

[Wiktionary]

But above all/first and foremost, your philosophy of XXX is what is most appealing to me.

2

Above all, your philosophy of XXX is what is most appealing to me.

But in the first place, your philosophy of XXX is what is most appealing to me.

  • I wouldn't suggest either of these options, because both sound(/are) significantly redundant. – SAH Dec 9 '15 at 12:48
  • I don't think this answer is what op is looking for. – haha Dec 9 '15 at 15:22
1

A great revision would be:

But your philosophy of XXX is what is [sic] most appealing to me.

(...Or

But your philosophy of XXX is what appeals to me [the] most.

--if you wanted to avoid the passive voice.)

  • This is a good revision for a lot of reasons, one of which is the fact that you don't really need "But most importantly" in your sentence. – SAH Dec 9 '15 at 12:49
  • Thanks for your answer. But I was listing several reasons (why something is appealing to me) with the parallel structure, and my example sentence is the last and the most important reason. It is not really an independent sentence in my paragraph. – jwong Dec 9 '15 at 12:57
  • @jwong I know. You should still use my revisions. The original style sounds juvenile (no offense meant by this!) – SAH Dec 9 '15 at 21:53
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You can probably replace "most appealing" with some synonyms of "appealing".

For example:

But most importantly, your philosophy of XXX is what is enticing to me.

or

But most importantly, your philosophy of XXX is what captivates me thoroughly.


Edit:

Below is a more formal alternative:

intrigue - arouse the curiosity or interest of; fascinate.

But most importantly, your philosophy of XXX is what intrigued me.

  • 1
    Whoever downvoted my answer, can you please justify? OP had requested for suggestions that remove redundancy and I think I have just done that. I am asking in order to improve my responses in the future. – BiscuitBoy Dec 9 '15 at 12:52
  • 1
    I am not the downvoter, but personally I don't like these options because they sound too emotional or personal for formal writing. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Dec 9 '15 at 13:37

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