0

For example, I assume a "M.Sc. student" would be a person who hasn't yet obtained a Masters degree?

I'm almost sure this is what it means, but not 100% sure, so I'd like to have it verified.

(I'm sorry if this should got to ELL.)

5
1

A "masters" student would mean a student studying towards a masters degree.

It's just a shorthand (used mainly in first person I think)

I am a masters student

vs

I am a student studying towards a masters degree

Those who already have degrees would typically say

I have a/my masters [degree]

note: It's rather hard to find concrete rules about colloquialisms but Wikipedia, for example, follows the rules I stated: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postgraduate_education

3
1

For example, I assume a "M.Sc. student" would be a person who hasn't yet obtained a Masters degree?

Firstly, it would be an M Sc student, and unless it was important to distinguish, most often people would just say "a masters student". And yes - an M Sc student would be one studying for it, rather than one who has obtained it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.