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Is it (grammatically) correct to put “thus” at the end of a sentence, like in this example?

Most properties carry over directly. We only need to discuss them for one case thus.

I know that I could move thus to the beginning: “Thus we only need to discuss them for one case.” I try to not overuse such conjunctions at the beginning of sentences, as for me, it seems to disrupt the “flow”.

How about “hence” instead of “thus”, does it make a difference?

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When thus means "therefore", it normally shouldn't be at the end. In that sense, it can often be replaced with hence.

When it means "in this manner", it's perfectly fine at the end.

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    You can certainly put some equivalents such as therefore at the end (normally preceded by a pause in speech, or a comma in writing). So although your answer would be appropriate if this were being asked on English Language Learners (where querents usually only really want to know "standard" usage), I think on ELU it would be worth exploring why the final position doesn't work at all well with thus (perhaps it's simply because of potential confusion with the other meaning). – FumbleFingers Dec 7 '15 at 17:39
  • You say: “In that sense, it can often be replaced with hence.” Is it OK then to end the sentences with “hence”? – Sebastian Dec 8 '15 at 9:54
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    @Sebastian: Hence is normally not used at the end. Perhaps it is possible under certain circumstances, but that is not standard. – Cerberus Dec 8 '15 at 13:11
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    Well, all that's happening is we're moving an adverbial word/clause (from its "normal" position at the start) to the end of the utterance. The acceptability of this process ranges from very normal (e.g. - actually, then) thru "unusual" (e.g. - hence, thus) to "totally weird" (e.g. - so, when it means therefore). But there's obviously not going to be a grammatical rule governing this process that specifically defines certain usages as "valid", and others not. – FumbleFingers Dec 8 '15 at 14:11
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    I'm sure there are plenty more adverbial terms in the general area of "causal relationships". For example, I think I'd put in that case somewhere in between actually, then and hence, thus in terms of whether they can be successfully relocated to the end of the utterance. But it really is hard to see how any kind of rule could be formulated defining exactly where the "acceptable / unacceptable" boundary should be placed. More useful would be some idea of why some words go at one end of the scale, and some at the other (I've absolutely no idea why this might be though! :) – FumbleFingers Dec 8 '15 at 23:37
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I try to no overuse such conjunctions in the beginning of sentences, as for me, it seems to disrupt the “flow”.

There is an equally good argument that the appropriate conjunction increases the flow of both reading and meaning.

I think it's difficult to improve on: "Most properties carry over directly, so we only need to discuss them for one case." More formally, you might use the passive voice: "Most properties carry over directly, so only one case needs to be discussed." (Or more crisply, "need be discussed.").

There is an old-fashioned but still meaningful idiom in English: It was ever thus.

It normally follows a sentence describing a state of affairs that has no implied end-point, such as: "With each new technological breakthrough, the rich get richer and the poor stay poor."

  • I agree, “so” is a good connective and less invasive than “thus”, “therefore” or “hence”. I already use “so“ so much ... – Sebastian Dec 8 '15 at 7:20
  • “It was ever thus” is an example of the second meaning of “thus” given by Cerberus. – Sebastian Dec 8 '15 at 7:24
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If you mean to make sense of this: Most properties carry over directly. We only need to discuss them for one case thus.

The logical way to write it should be thus [deixis]:

Most properties carry over directly.
- Thus, we only need to discuss them for one case thus. OR
- Therefore, we only need to discuss them for one case.
OR
- So, we only need to [etc.] //

I would draw the nose thus: [This is a placeholder]

"thus" can be used for purposes of deixis, as a deictic word referring to something a speaker is illustrating in reality.

deixis or reference

Therefore and thus are otherwise placed at the head of a sentence. They are adverbs and point to what follows as being related to what preceded, usually to show a writer's or speaker's presenting some kind of logical result they come to (not necessarily "real logic").

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