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In my native language, there is a word that is usually said to exceptional people. It is an adjective that means, for example, that you are so great, you could be made an example for others.

To make it somewhat clear, if I were to make up an english word to match this definition, I would say something like "example-able". The reason I'd choose that is to match the logic of words like "wash-able" which means "something that can be washed."

Usage: "You are ________" or "He is an _______ person".

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You could say role model, or exemplary.

role model (noun)- a person whose behavior, example, or success is or can be emulated by others,especially by younger people.

exemplary (adj)- worthy of imitation; commendable:

(dictionary.com)

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Ideal may be used to refer to someone who is considered as a perfect examples and possibly as a source of inspiration for others:

  • Conforming to a standard of perfection or excellence; perfect or highly satisfactory: an ideal politician, an ideal friend.

The Free Dictionary

  • I used a person as an example, but the word I was looking for was to refer to any noun (hence my original question/posts title). – codefl0w Dec 6 '15 at 8:35
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    Okay. A phrase that is used regularly is "example par excellence", but most words used for this are adjectives rather than nouns (ideal, unparallelled, superb, among others). The word "standard" used to mean the perfect example that everything else should aim for, but it has taken on the meaning of average or ordinary. – Cargill Dec 6 '15 at 9:48
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In my native language, there is a word that is usually said to exceptional people.

In most English language usage, such high-sounding words would rarely be said directly to the person; it would much more commonly be said of someone or about someone, either in speech or in print. (The most obvious exception might be the gushing judges on a TV talent program or an awards night).

I think role model used on its own might not be quite as praising as you are seeking, however "outstanding" or "brilliant" or "wonderful" before it might work.

  • I used a person as an example, but the word I was looking for was to refer to any noun (hence my original question/posts title). – codefl0w Dec 6 '15 at 8:36

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