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How well understood is the abbreviation “IoT” for “Internet of things”?

A company has a product, let’s call it the “IoT Refrigerator.” At first glance, I personally had no idea what this “IoT” is. However, I see that the Wikipedia entry initially says “Internet of Things” and then uses “IoT.”

The company wants to make a video about this IoT Refrigerator, and so there will be repeated “eye oh tea” will do this and “eye oh tea” will do that, explaining this new technology.

Would it be best to simply say “Internet of things” in every case except for the product name itself? Or would it be ok to introduce the term in the long form (“Internet of Things, IoT”) and then just use the abbreviation after that.

closed as primarily opinion-based by user140086, Nathaniel, MetaEd, Marv Mills, Mitch Dec 11 '15 at 16:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Never once saw "IoT" before. (My first thought was that you horribly misspelled "LotR".) For that matter, I have no idea what the heck this "Internet of things" is. Yes I've heard it before, but it's vapid marketese for executives, so I'm not the target audience. Which, of course, in turn means that if you are talking to the target audience, whom you notice use "IoT" themselves all the time, by all means knock yourself out and put it in every sentence of yours. But when talking to me or my grandma, only common regular run-of-the-mill comprehensible English will do. – RegDwigнt Dec 1 '15 at 11:06
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    It is meaningless to the vast majority of people. I have seen the term a few dozen times, being on the IEEE mailing list, but did not recognize it until I opened the question and saw it spelled out. Maybe in 10 years that will change. – Hot Licks Dec 1 '15 at 11:58
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    (I suspect that there is a reluctance on the part of much of the tech community to embrace this term as it smells strongly of a buzzword that will disappear in a few years. How many people remember "B to B"?) – Hot Licks Dec 1 '15 at 14:50
  • IoT products are "connected or "communicating" products. – Graffito Dec 1 '15 at 17:06
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    @HotLicks: Or more horrifying still, "B2B"? – Sven Yargs Dec 2 '15 at 7:51
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This is a commonly used abbreviation nowadays in the technology field. However I don't think that the customer knows the meaning. I think that in the near future it will be use by everybody; in the same way that people use "IT".

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    And would people in tech easily understand it if spoken, such as in "Here are the great things that eye-oh-tea will provide in the near future"? – curious-proofreader Dec 1 '15 at 11:40
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    It's getting to that point, although, currently, it's still common to have the words spelled out. – ralph.m Dec 1 '15 at 13:13

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