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When we have a sentence like

I can identify with a company's products

Does the plural form of the "a" depend on the "company's" or on the "products"? The latter would mean that it had to be a "the" instead but I am simply unsure what word to refer to here.

Bonus points if anyone could recommend me accurate terms to describe this problem because I simply didn't know what to search for

marked as duplicate by deadrat, michael_timofeev, Nathaniel, choster, Hellion Dec 3 '15 at 16:26

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There isn't a plural form of "a".

An article on a possessive phrase always relates to the possessor:

A company's products = the products of a company

The company's products = the products of the company

The choice of "a" or "the" has nothing to do with the products or their plurality. It is no different from a non-possessive example: normally, "the company" refers to a company which is already identified in the speaker's mind. "A company" refers to a company which has not so far been introduced into the discouse.

  • thanks a lot, also great job on explaining the terminology! – user2875404 Nov 29 '15 at 22:37

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