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Large amounts of gold weren’t worth much and merely had to be gotten ridden of in olden times like in modern times.'

OR

Large amounts of gold aren't worth much and merely have to be gotten rid of in olden times like in modern times.

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    No, the second sentence really doesn't work (unless you are The Doctor and can talk about the past in the present tense). The first one does. But surely only children say "olden times" any more? – mikeagg Nov 26 '15 at 15:27
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    'Gotten ridden' is not right unless you are referring to horses; even 'gotten rid' is an American regionalism. – TimLymington Nov 26 '15 at 15:28
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Neither are grammatically correct in my view because of 'like' and a missing comma, the old form verb 'gotten' is in its present tense, and 'ridden' is to do with riding. I would therefore rewrite as:

"Large amounts of gold weren’t worth much and merely had to be got rid of in olden times, as in modern times."

"Large amounts of gold aren't worth much and merely have to be gotten rid of in olden times, as in modern times."

I would argue that 'olden times' is an affectation or archaism, a modern phrase used to parody an older way of talking, not that older way itself, in the same way that "þe old shoppe" became "Ye olde shoppe". It would be better to recast it:

"Large amounts of gold were not worth very much because they had to be stored, as is true today."

"Large amounts of gold aren't worth much and merely have to be got rid of in both ancient and modern times."

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