1

Context:

Friend 1: Why don't you go for a second opinion. Its hightime.
Friend 2: Yes, right, I got to take a call on that.

Here is the usage "take a call" right instead of "I have to a take a decision"?

Also,

Friend 2: Yes, right, I got to make a call on that.

Here is the usage "make a call" right instead of "I have to a take a decision"?

Which is the right usage? Please clarify.

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Oddly, there is a sense where "take a call" means "not decide", vaguely similar to a sense of the idiom "take a rain check". I suspect it somehow relates to umpiring in sports, but I don't know what the specific analogy would be.

It's impossible to be sure which of the several senses of "take a call" was intended in the OP's snippet, but my guess is that it meant "I need to defer the decision until I get more information (presumably from the second opinion)".

1

"Take a call" is a phrase specific to Indian English. It means the same thing as "make a call" which is to make a decision or a judgement.

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"Take call on" means "take decision", but it's a bit informal and creates confusion to many. But those who boast of their English knowledge use this phrase a lot.

  • 1
    No, it's make a call on something, not take a call on something.Taking a call means accepting a phone call not making a decision. – tchrist Dec 4 '16 at 14:42

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